As I’ve said, Kuretake’s brush pen numbering scheme really makes no sense. The Kuretake #13 is a cartridge-filled, synthetic hair brush, but the Kuretake #14 is a disposable felt tip, nevermind that Kuretake has several un-numbered lines of disposable felt tips??

Kuretake #14 brush pen.

Kuretake #14 brush pen.

But whatever. Every brush pen’s worth a go, yeah?

Kuretake #14 brush test.

Kuretake #14 brush test.

Kuretake #14 dry time

The brush tip on the #14 is short and fine, but extremely flexible. This gives the pen a good range of possible line thicknesses, but it also makes it harder to control, especially on curved strokes. The flexibility of the brush makes it extra sensitive to pressure and very “flicky,” which can lead to a lot of unwanted “tails” at the end of lines if you’re not careful.

Like most Kuretake pens, the ink is alcohol/Copic-proof, but not waterproof, though once the ink is dry, water seems to mostly just fade it, rather than make it bleed.

The dry time on the ink is about five seconds, which is reaaaaaally slow when you’re sketching. Dry time has been a problem for me in most of Kuretake’s other disposable brush pens, including the Fudegokochi line, and the accidental smudging didn’t improve here with the #14.

Kuretake #14 sketch test

Long strokes with the Kuretake #14, especially thick ones, run dry very quickly.

The effect is sort of nice for sketching since it sort of encourages you to be looser — if the lines aren’t going to look perfect anyway, you may as well sketch more freely? I guess that’s utilising the failings of the pen more than anything else though… the tendency for the ink to run dry in the middle for long, thick strokes also makes it harder to tell when the pen is running dry for real.

Kuretake #14 sketch test

I really don’t like the Kuretake #14 for serious inking though. Long strokes running dry means I have to ink over the same lines several times. The flexibility of the brush tip makes it harder to control smaller strokes, since it’s very easy to put too much pressure on the pen and end up with a thicker stroke.

Being able to get a wide range of stroke thicknesses is usually great for speed and efficiency, since it means you don’t have to swap pens to get different types of strokes, but since the dry time on the Kuretake’s ink is pretty long, you have to slow down to avoid smudging anyway.

Most lines end up thicker than I want because thin ones end up wobbly or I need to cover up "flicks."

Most lines end up thicker than I want because thin ones end up wobbly, or I need to cover up “flicks” or dry spots.

It’d be much better to use a pen with a harder tip for detail work and much better to use a pen with better ink flow for thicker strokes. The Kuretake #14 is acceptable for sketching, but then again, most pens are. The particular qualities of any given pen don’t matter much when the work isn’t meant to be clean, final, or “for” anything other than practice.

Conclusion: I probably wouldn’t buy this pen again.

A decent pen for rough sketching/studies though.

A decent pen for rough sketching/studies though.